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20130122
20130122
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been in combat as the indicator of the popular view of a sitting president. the public was not over enchanted with the war in iraq when george w. bush ran for reelection. against john kerry, but voted by a sma
this morning. franklin roosevelt did that because george washington had done it. i mean there's just something wonderful about that. he got out of the car and walked and so did mrs. obama. why? because jimmy carter did it in 1977. every president since has done it. i mean, >> a great strength to him. he might be more liberal than most people politically. in his personal demeanor, in his family life and in his style he's a very traditional person. that came across. that helps people relate to him. >> ifill: mark said he talked to a democrat who said he thought he did pretty well. did you talk to any republicans? >> i think they thought it was a good speech. people said this was one of his best speeches. some of them thought it was defensive, about defending the welfare state more than being offensive. i think the sentence that really got some republicans more upset was where he said we don't have to choose between protecting the programs for the elderly and securing programs for the young. i would say most republicans say, well, actually we do have a choose. if you keep the current benefit leve
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
'm jumping ahead a little bit but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country and the year we give an address to the nation and the congress. roosevelt in 1934 set on set on getting it in the many calls at the state of the union. a lot of these terms which were created by presidents we think are there from day one and in fact they are ones that have been in it later. and again some of them are just wonderful. let me just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist in the applied it to dolley madison and the first that anyone had used that term. he referred to as the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. jumping around a little bit but woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow wilson. first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where there was a lot of feeling that we should go in and interven
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too-- at the beginning of his time he had both houses of congress in democratic hands. he was turning to something called impoundment saying i'm just not going to spend the money for these bills, these acts, these agencies that democrats are voting for in the house and senate and even in the absence of watergate it's possible that that could have gone to impeachment. >> rose: jon meacham in nashville, thomas jonathan van everyson after a successful first term in which the louisiana purchase was dominant he goes into the second term and what happens? >> well his second inaugural address is largely an attack on the press so he set a tone there. every subsequent president has wanted to do that, ma
, beautiful buildings, the lincoln memorial, actually passed the lincoln memorial onto the franklin delano roosevelt memorial. something struck me there, quote from fdr: the test about progress is not whether we add more to those who have enough but whether we provided enough to those who do not have enough. we want to make sure that people see real differences. i look forward to working with all of you colleagues for years to come. i am excited about what comes forward this next year; i am excited about the changes that we have with new blood here on the board of supervisors. it makes things interesting. thank you very much for your time. (applause) >> i want to thank all of you for the incredible honor of serving as your president for the next two years; other forward to continuing to work with each and every one of you is great to see you faces, supervisors yee and breed. there are so many cool that we need to thank; it takes a village to support the work that we are doing and i want to take a few moments to thank special people in my life. first of course, i have to thank th
inaugurals are terrible. i would ak cemeccept franklin roosevelt and in some sense, the president was echoing that when he talked about the shrinking few who do very well and the growing many who barely get by. but what is amazing is it was a bookend. and i think rick's right about this. it was a bookend to the reagan speech in 1980. it made progressive vision for america mainstream. it claimed the mainstream of america for progressive values. i think it's a very significant speech. >> well, rick, respond to that. i think it develops the point.-Ñ listen to what the president said about the middle class. take a look here, rick. >> we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well when a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. >> well, the president gave a strong defense to entitlement. he alrejected the division the term by paul ryan with the makers and the takers. >> we do not believe that in this country, freedom is reserved for the lucky. or happiness for the fe
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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